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  • Call us on:01287 637470
  • Emergency:01642 217605

Our Services

Our practice provides a range of pet care services

We offer a complete Veterinary Service

The practice provides a full range of services and our veterinary care is underpinned by the use of a full range of modern treatments. A list of services is detailed below:

  • Vaccinations
  • Neutering
  • Medical management of diseases
  • Surgery - both soft tissue and orthopaedics
  • Dentistry
  • Pregnancy scans and ultrasound investigation of disease
  • Reproductive management
  • Flea and worming treatments
  • Weight clinics
  • Diabetic clinic
  • Blood testing
  • Pet passports
  • Microchipping
  • Senior wellness clinics x-rays (including hip scoring for the kennel club)

Cat neutering

Unfortunately, the number of kittens born each year, far outweighs the number of good homes available to care for them, and consequently many are left to fend for themselves. Having your cat neutered will reduce these numbers and is one of the simplest things that can be done to ensure your cat is healthy and happy for as long as possible.

There are many health benefits to neutering your cat

Early spaying of females will greatly reduce their chances of developing mammary cancer (breast cancer) later in life as well as preventing dangerous uterus infections known as a pyometra. It will also stop female cats from developing false pregnancies and they will not come into heat.

Castrating male cats will stop them from developing diseases of the prostate later in life. It will also help to prevent any aggressive behaviour, reducing the amount of cat fights they are involved in as well as reducing the number of diseases they can pick up from fighting. It will also help with behaviours such as spraying urine in the house and wandering long distances from home whilst looking for female cats.

Bringing your cat in for neutering:

  • Both spaying and castration require an anaesthetic
  • Your cat must be fasted overnight before the operation
  • Your cat should be ready to come home on the day of surgery
  • Please contact reception if you require a quote for price

Choosing the right age for neutering

Both male and female cats can be neutered from an early age. Most will be big enough by the time they are 4 or 5 months of age. If you have any questions about neutering and how it could benefit your cat, please contact the practice and we will be happy to discuss this in more detail with you.

 

Dog neutering

Unfortunately, the number of puppies born each year, far outweighs the number of good homes available to care for them, and consequently many are left in rescue shelters or abandoned. Having your dog neutered will reduce these numbers and is one of the simplest things that can be done to ensure your dog is healthy and happy for as long as possible.

There are many health benefits to neutering your dog

Early spaying of females will greatly reduce their chances of developing mammary cancer (breast cancer) later in life as well as preventing dangerous, life threatening uterus infections known as a pyometra. It will also stop female dogs from developing false pregnancies and they will no longer come in to heat.

Castrating male dogs will stop them from developing diseases of the prostate and testes later in life. It will also help to prevent any aggressive or sexual behaviour as well as reducing the risk of wandering away from home to look for females.

Bringing your dog in for neutering

  • Both spaying and castration require an anaesthetic
  • Your dog must be fasted overnight before the operation
  • Your dog should be ready to come home on the day of surgery
  • Please contact reception if you require a quote for prices

Choosing the right age for neutering

The best time to neuter a female dog is 12 weeks after their season ends so they are mid-cycle. However, in smaller breeds, some can be neutered at 6 months old, before the first season. Most male dogs will be ready for neutering at 6 months old or onwards. A quick check by one of our vets or nurses will be able to tell you if your dog is ready to be neutered.

If you have any questions about neutering and how it could benefit your dog, please contact the practice and we will be happy to discuss this in more detail with you.

Inpatient Care

Our highest priority at Wilton House Veterinary Clinic is the welfare of the patients under our care, particularly our in-patients.

The Veterinary Clinic is staffed by experience Veterinary Surgeons and qualified Veterinary Nurses, supported by a team of Veterinary Nurse Assistants.  We provide inpatient care, 6 days per week; Monday – Friday 8.30 am – 7.00 pm and Saturday 8.30 am – 1.30 pm.  In addition, we have emergency appointments available on a Sunday 10.00 am - 12.00 noon.  

Patients stay whilst having clinical treatment or post-operative surgery to ensure they receive the best possible care and recovery.  Please note we do not admit animals the night before elective procedures.  
The inpatient unit is designed to high veterinary standards.  We have 21 kennels in varying sizes, including 8 spacious kennels to accommodate large breed dogs which have been designed for warmth, quiet and comfort.  
Patients are checked regularly by members of staff throughout the day and after   recovery are taken outside for toileting as applicable.  All staff have been trained in animal handling.  

We have a separate cattery area to accommodate 10 cats.

All cages are cleaned regularly, contain blankets and food and water are available unless nil by mouth.
We also have an Isolation Room to minimise the risk of spread of contagious diseases to other in-patients.
Please ask a member of our team to show you the inpatient facilities if you would like to view them prior to making a treatment decision.  

Overnight care

Following clinical assessment if an animal requires supervision overnight the Veterinary Surgeon will discuss with the owner and advise that the pet is taken directly to; VetsNow, Victoria Street, Middlesbrough, TS1 5QZ (tel: 01642 217605) who are open from 7.00 pm – 8.30 am weekdays as we do not provide Out of Hours services and we do not have staff on site overnight.  The Clinical team will ensure that a full clinical history is provided to VetsNow.

In the event that an animal requires overnight care without supervision (i.e. there may be occasions when an animal needs to be segregated from other pets at home or needs to be in a confined space to restrict movement) this will be discussed and following the owner’s consent will remain on the premises overnight.  When necessary we arrange for nominated staff to attend the Clinic outside of normal working hours to monitor animals. 
 

Rabbit Neutering

Unfortunately, the number of rabbits born each year, far outweighs the number of good homes available to care for them, and consequently many are left to fend for themselves. Having your rabbit neutered will reduce these numbers and is one of the simplest things that can be done to ensure your rabbit is healthy and happy for as long as possible.

There are many health benefits to neutering your rabbit

80% of female rabbits will develop a type of uterine cancer known as an adenocarcinoma by the age of five. Early speying of females will greatly reduce their chances of developing mam-mary cancer (breast cancer) later in life as well as preventing hormonal behaviour.

Castrating male rabbits will help to prevent any aggressive behaviour, reducing the amount of fighting they are involved in as well as prevention of urine spraying. 

Rabbits do have a slightly higher anaesthesia risk than dogs and cats. However, the benefits of neutering in an otherwise healthy rabbit generally far outweigh the risk.

Bringing your rabbit in for neutering

  • Both speying and castration in rabbits requires an anaesthetic
  • Please contact reception if you require a quote for prices
  • Bring in some of your rabbits normal food so it can be fed afterwards
  • Do not withhold food from your rabbit before surgery. Rabbits do not need to be starved before any procedure which requires an anaesthetic
  • Your rabbit should be ready to come home on the day of surgery, though occasionally we do keep rabbits in overnight to monitor them and make sure they are eating again

Choosing the right age for neutering

Both male and female rabbits can be neutered from an early age. Most will be big enough by the time they are 4 or 5 months of age. A quick check by one of our vets or nurses will be able to tell you if your rabbit is ready to be neutered. 

If you have any questions about neutering and how it could benefit your rabbit, please contact the practice and we will be happy to discuss this in more detail with you.

Vaccinating Your Dog

Vaccinations help to protect your dog against many different diseases and they are often a re-quirement if your dog goes into kennels. A puppy vaccination course at Wilton House consists of 2 vaccinations which are 2-4 weeks apart. The earliest the second vaccination can be done is 10 weeks of age. Puppies are able to start to go for walks 1-2 weeks after their second injection.

The Diseases Core Vaccination Protects Against

Parvovirus - a highly infectious disease which mostly affects puppies and elderly dogs and is mostly fatal if contracted. It causes severe vomiting and diarrhoea which can quickly lead to intestinal damage and dehydration.

Distemper - a virus of which there is no cure and affected dogs can have lifelong problems if the virus is contracted. It can cause fever, coughing, gastroenteritis signs, seizures and death.

Adenovirus - a virus that causes hepatitis (infection of the liver) and sometimes lungs of affect-ed dogs and can remain in the environment for many months.

Leptospirosis - a disease that is quickly on the rise

  • If infected, dogs can quickly develop multiple organ failure and become seriously ill.
  • Vaccinations against Leptospirosis only last 1 year - so it is particularly important to keep up to date with yearly boosters.
  • Dogs most at risk are those in the working dog population as well as dogs that regularly swim or spend a lot of time in wooded or swampy areas.
  • Leptospirosis is a bacterial infection that is spread by urine of rats and infected animals and causes a fever as well as liver and kidney inflammation.

Other Available Vaccinations

Kennel Cough - a vaccination that is squirted up the nose to protect against the bacteria that cause kennel cough.

Rabies - if your pet is travelling abroad, a rabies vaccination will be required at least 3 weeks before travel. If you would like to enquire about the pet passport scheme, please contact us for more information.

Practice information

Wilton House Veterinary Clinic

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  • Mon
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Tue
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Wed
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Thu
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Fri
    8:30am - 7:00pm
  • Sat
    8:30am - 1:30pm
  • Sun
    10:00am - 12:00pm

Emergency Details

Please call:

01642 217605
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Find us here:

Wilton House Veterinary Clinic Wilton Lane Guisborough TS14 6JA
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Please call this number for emergencies:

01642 217605